Secondary Education – Woonsocket High http://woonsockethigh.org/ Sun, 09 Oct 2022 20:39:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://woonsockethigh.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/woonsocket-high-icon-150x150.png Secondary Education – Woonsocket High http://woonsockethigh.org/ 32 32 Area high school water polo treads new ground https://woonsockethigh.org/area-high-school-water-polo-treads-new-ground/ Sun, 09 Oct 2022 20:39:59 +0000 https://woonsockethigh.org/area-high-school-water-polo-treads-new-ground/ SAN ANTONIO — Alamo Heights water polo is in a familiar place — the playoffs.

However, this year strikes differently in the inaugural year of the sport’s affiliation with UIL.

Last year, the Mules boys and girls were the only area schools to qualify for the Texas Intercollegiate Swimming Coaches Association (TISCA) state tournament.

Both teams brought back a lot of experience from those runs and that’s the main reason each reached records of 10-0 in the 25-6A district and overall records of 19-2.

Top players for the Mules include Meriden Black who has 50+ goals and Avery Kieschnick who has 40+ goals. Goaltender Emma Hetrick averages 8.0 blocks per game. Other top returnees are Liliana Gamiz and Francesca Batiz.

Alamo Heights top boys include EJ Gonzales, Vance Matthews, Derek Montoya, Jude Adan and James Cox.

Both teams hope to build on a legacy established since 1972 when they started playing as a club team at TISCA.

First round

Girls

Brandeis vs. New Braunfels Canyon, 5:15 p.m. Monday Alamo Heights Natatorium

Alamo Heights vs. Boerne Champion, 5:15 p.m. Monday, Northside ISD Swim Center

Davenport vs. Clark, 6:30 p.m. Monday, Alamo Heights Natatorium

Health Careers vs. Smithson Valley, 6:30 p.m. Monday, Northside ISD Swim Center

Taft vs. Highlands, 7:45 p.m. Monday, Northside ISD Swim Center

To note:
Brennan, Southwest, Southwest Legacy, Holmes, O’Connor, Harlan and Stevens receive first-round byes

Boys

Clark vs. New Braunfels Canyon, 5:15 a.m. Tuesday, Alamo Heights Natatorium

Boerne Champion vs. Smithson Valley, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Pieper High School

Harlan vs. Highlands, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Northside ISD Swim Center

Marshall vs. Alamo Heights, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Alamo Heights Natatorium

Davenport vs. Brandeis, 7:45 p.m. Tuesday, Alamo Heights Natatorium

To note:
O’Connor, Brennan, Warren, Jay, Holmes, Stevens and Southwest Legacy receive first-round byes

Key dates

Monday: Beginning of the playoffs

October 22:
Regional Tournament IV, Southwest ISD Aquatic Center

October 29:
(Provisional) Josh Davis Natatorium, San Antonio


Both won state titles in 1979. The girls were runners-up in 1977, 1978, and 1986. The boys were runners-up in 1978, 1980, 1981, and 1985.

Perfect Brandeis Girls

The Brandeis girls, 26-6A district champions, are 15-0 (8-0 in the league) and were one of two teams to defeat Alamo Heights. The Broncos play in New Braunfels Canyon at 5:15 p.m. Monday at the Alamo Heights Natatorium. They beat Canyon 13-2 earlier this season.

Senior Grace Goldhammer has a team record 45 goals followed by 30 for junior Camila Diarte. Senior Reeve Sanchez has 24 goals and 20 assists. Senior goaltender Ashley Easley made 56 saves.

“I have three or four girls who are really committed to playing at the club all summer, so we had a solid foundation for this season,” said Megan Perez, who coaches the girls’ and boys’ teams at Brandeis.

The Broncos have successfully blended that experience with newcomers to the sport.

“Our girls are really ready to embrace the sport and learn and accept this criticism of everything we work on and race with,” Perez said. “Our senior leadership has a goal that we want to go further in the playoffs and we want to go in the state for the first year.”

The beginnings of the champion

Boerne Champion never had a water polo team – club or otherwise – until this season.

The Chargers boys won the district championship 26-6A going 8-0 in league and 10-0 overall with a mix of experience and newcomers.

“They managed to pick up on some of the more basic parts of the game pretty quickly,” said Alberto Escalante, who coaches the boys’ and girls’ teams. “It was fun getting them technically outfitted and then going through game scenarios.”

Bexon Harrison, Jake Canales, Will Harrison, Emi Martinez-Galaraza, Roberto Perez-Puente and Ian Rutledge have club experience from San Antonio teams.

The Chargers girls made the playoffs despite starting with players with little or no experience. The champ went 2-6 in district and 3-7 overall.

Top female performers include Kate Deykin, Cayden Van Dyne, Victoria Adame, Kenna Chastain, Jacey Wolf, Cora Skoog and Lilly Schiffelbein.

The format under UIL

Until this year, TISCA had held state playoffs every year since 1972. This also included private school participation.

After years of serving as an intramural sport and club in high school, water polo begins its first postseason run at a UIL sport on Monday.

There is only one classification – Class 6A – for schools of all enrollment levels. There are 32 districts, eight of which are divided into four regions.

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SNHU appoints first female board chair https://woonsockethigh.org/snhu-appoints-first-female-board-chair/ Fri, 07 Oct 2022 18:31:04 +0000 https://woonsockethigh.org/snhu-appoints-first-female-board-chair/

In a crowded on-campus auditorium, the inspiring women of the Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU) Board of Trustees gathered for a panel discussion in early October. Moderated by the SNHU Chief Experience Officer sue nathanthe roundtable highlighted the voices and experiences of female members of the university’s board of trustees.

Together, each of the directors shared their unique perspectives and discussed the impact that leadership roles can have on the women in them.

SNHU Board Maribel Duran speaking at the Women on Board panel“Women walk around with different identities,” said Maribel Duran ’16. “I am very proud to say that I was a teenage mother, a single mother and a first generation adult learner. It took me almost 17 years to get my bachelor’s degree, and I carry those identities with me in many rooms. Over time, I learned by observation. I learned from the bravest leaders, and I learned from not so great leaders. You take notes, learn, and start creating more tools in your toolbox.

SNHU Board of Directors Janiece Y. Evans-Page listening to other panelists speak at SNHU's Women on Board eventWhen asked if there was a singular moment that Janiece Y. Evans-Page realized she was officially a leader, she said, “I’m the one who believes that leadership can start and happen anywhere. For me, it was really when I knew I had a sense of agency and when I could give direction and inspire others.

Lisa Guertin shared his thoughts on impostor syndrome. “I vividly remember my first job coming out of college and looking at senior executives and fully believing, ‘they’re different, they’re cut from a different cloth,'” she said. “Then you become one by title, but you think ‘I’m still just me.’ As you rise in leadership you realize this and it is liberating.

Reflect on what it means to be a leader, Dr. MaryEllen C. McGuire highlighted the importance of strategic thinking. Earlier in her career, a co-worker told her, “You have to get off the dance floor and onto the balcony. You need to start thinking long term. It’s not just about deliverables. Think beyond that – really live your mission every day. She believes strategic thinking didn’t come naturally, and this advice prompted her to change her mindset.

SNHU's Director of Experience, Sue Nathan, moderates the Women's Panel on the Board of Six SNHU Board MembersDiane Tryneski expressed that often in her career she was the only woman in the room. At first, she didn’t feel comfortable talking, but she found that having confidence in herself made all the difference. She also shared the importance of having diverse voices in the workplace. “In my career, I would hire people who didn’t come to a position traditionally,” she said. “I think it’s a lot about what someone brings to the role and having a look that sees things differently from the band. It’s that magic, like a recipe. You always add to it.

Among the panelists was Winnie Lerner, who recently became the first female board chair in SNHU history. She joined the board in 2015 and is currently co-CEO of FGS Global for North America, a communications consultancy. The board unanimously elected Lerner president.

“It is an honor and a privilege to take on this position, replacing Mark (Ouellette), who has been an incredible Chairman of the Board,” said Lerner. “He truly left an incredible mark on the institution, and it is with great humility that I stand here today and take on this role.”

During the panel, she also emphasized the importance of finding your passions and being part of meaningful work. “For me, what gets me out of bed every day is versatile, flexible, interesting and interconnected work,” she said.

SNHU Board Chair Winnie Lerner listens to panelists speak at SNHU's Women on Board eventPrior to Lerner’s role at FGS, Lerner led corporate communications at Ralph Lauren and served as President of the Abernathy MacGregor Group. She also worked as an energy and commerce legislative aide on Capitol Hill and worked on presidential and congressional campaigns. She has advised senior executives of companies in transition and through mergers and acquisitions, crises and leadership changes for more than two decades. Lerner advises companies through complex moments of change and develops strategies to build their profiles and communicate their mission and business goals to important audiences.

“We are thrilled to welcome Winnie Lerner as the first female chair of the board,” said Paul LeBlanc, president of the SNHU. “Winnie brings to SNHU a wealth of experience, creativity, and a deep commitment to our mission. This is an important day for Southern New Hampshire University, and I look forward to working together to continue transforming lives at scale.” .

From left to right: Outgoing SNHU Board Chair Mark Ouellette, SNHU Board Chair Winnie Lerner and SNHU President Paul LeBlancHis predecessor, Marc Ouellette ’77, served on the SNHU Board of Directors for 26 years, including nine years as Chairman of the Board. This month, he proudly passed the torch to Lerner.

“Working with Winnie over the past seven years has been a wonderful experience,” said Ouellette, outgoing Chair of the SNHU Board of Directors. “I know I’m leaving SNHU in very capable hands, and I’m confident Winnie will thrive in this role.”

Recognized by Forbes as one of the top employers for women in the nation, SNHU understands the importance of a diversity of voices and perspectives. The university currently maintains a 50/50 gender ratio on the board, and the majority of SNHU’s leadership team are women. SNHU is also working toward increased Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) representation, with the goal of achieving 50/50 in terms of white and non-white board members.

As part of these efforts, SNHU hosted Luis Lopez to the board this fall. Having built national, regional and international higher education networks, he has extensive knowledge of post-secondary education and its growing markets. As former CEO of Honoris United Universities, Lopez played a leading role in the launch and development of the pan-African network of private higher education institutions and its unique collaborative approach.

“While American higher education still has a long way to go in terms of gender and diversity in leadership roles, at SNHU we have experienced firsthand the benefits of a diverse board,” LeBlanc said. “Winnie and Luis are welcome additions to the SNHU Board of Directors, and their roles will support our continued growth as an organization.”

Melanie Drolet ’16 is a communications manager at Southern New Hampshire University.

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Boston’s new schools superintendent officially begins her new role https://woonsockethigh.org/bostons-new-schools-superintendent-officially-begins-her-new-role/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 10:28:23 +0000 https://woonsockethigh.org/bostons-new-schools-superintendent-officially-begins-her-new-role/

Mary Skipper’s official start date as Boston Schools’ new superintendent is Monday.

As the sixth person to hold the position in just the past decade, all eyes will be on how the Boston native and veteran school administrator will tackle long-standing challenges in Massachusetts’ largest school district – and if it will be able to stay in place.

“I am thrilled that Monday has finally arrived,” said Jeri Robinson, chairman of the Boston school committee. “Mary has been very involved behind the scenes since signing her contract.”

Skipper, most recently the Somerville Public Schools leader who agreed to a four-year contract with an annual starting salary of $300,000 in her new role, was unavailable for an interview for this story. In recent public remarks at the Boston Globe Summit, however, she underscored her intention to continue the work being done under Acting Superintendent Drew Echelson.

“It’s wonderful to be back,” Skipper, a former Boston Public Schools teacher, principal and administrator, told WBUR. RadioBoston in an interview in August.

“It’s wonderful to reconnect with so many colleagues here at BPS who are doing such great work. It’s also wonderful to welcome back those who have left and come back to have fun as we rebuild the BPS,” she added.

The Boston school committee, by a 4-3 vote in June, chose Skipper for the role over BPS Regional Superintendent Tommy Welch. Although the students’ first day back from Boston was on September 8, Skipper’s start date was delayed so she could wind down her role at Somerville.

The start of the new school year for Boston students has been challenged by transportation issues, including a month-long shutdown of the Orange Line that has complicated transportation options for thousands of students and families. of the BPS.

On-time school bus arrivals will be a priority this year, as will significantly improving services for English language learners and students with disabilities, in line with a school improvement plan the district has negotiated with the state Board of Education over the summer to avoid receivership.

The Bruce Bolling Municipal Building in Dudley Sq., home of Boston Public School Headquarters. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Although Skipper is entering the BPS system at a time of intense scrutiny, she has not released detailed plans for how she will lead the district to success.

She said in August that she wanted to develop “healthy, student-centered schools” that include “prioritizing and accelerating academic performance” and “rebuilding and improving access to social learning.” and emotional for our students”.

“I think Mary Skipper comes with incredible experience and talent, so I’m excited to step forward and take this opportunity to support her in this work, but also to continue to ask the hard question for myself. ensure that we do well for our children,” said Boston school board member Brandon Cardet-Hernandez.

Want to “rebuild the BPS”

Skipper arrives in Boston with an academic improvement record in Somerville Public Schools. During his seven-year tenure, Somerville Schools continued a positive trend of improving graduation rates, attendance, and MCAS performance. Dropout rates dropped during his time there, according to data collected by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

Skipper recently told WBZ-TV that she is confident in her ability to transition from the Somerville Public Schools, which serve about 4,600 students, to the BPS system, which is about ten times larger.

“I am a practitioner, I am someone who comes from the field, I have been a teacher, a principal, I have managed a network of schools,” she said.

Much of Skipper’s career was spent at BPS. She spent 15 years working in Boston – first as a teacher, then a principal, and finally an administrator at the district’s central office. She also helped launch TechBoston Academy, a technology-focused school, in 2002.

The Dorchester resident and parent of three is the fourth permanent superintendent to run Boston schools in a decade — the sixth if you count interims. His predecessor, Brenda Cassellius, left after three years.

Skipper acknowledges the fleeting nature of the role and said she hopes to bring a sense of stability to the district — her time at BPS spanned a time that she says was more stable than it is now.

She told Radio Boston’s Tiziana Dearing in late August that she viewed the school improvement plan as the basis of the district’s goals and said the school system should aim higher than what has been set.

Filling district vacancies with diverse educators is also a priority.

Skipper told WBZ-TV in early September that she hopes to fill many roles by promoting staff who already work with the district and know the school culture. One example she cited is helping paraprofessionals get their teaching license and encouraging current teachers to become certified in additional skills.

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu says she is confident about the future of BPS under Skipper’s leadership.

“We’re going to get it right,” Wu told WBUR in August. “We are going to hit all of our hurdles and benchmarks as much as possible. Not because we have to be compliant, but because our students deserve every resource and every opportunity. »

Robinson, the school board chairman, said success in Boston’s public schools will take more than the energy and ideas of a new leader. It has to be teamwork.

“It’s not the magic of an individual,” she said.

“My question is, is Boston prepared to support its superintendent?” Robinson added. “We have 10,000 employees, 50,000 families, a city council, more resources than any other part of the country. Do we want Boston’s public schools to succeed as a city? And if so, what [are we] ready to do to make sure that happens? »

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Scott Gillespie | News, Sports, Jobs https://woonsockethigh.org/scott-gillespie-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 06:36:31 +0000 https://woonsockethigh.org/scott-gillespie-news-sports-jobs/


Scott Gillespie, 65, of Indiana, died Sunday, April 17, 2022 at his home.

Born on January 25, 1957, Scott was the son of the late Woodrow and Madelyn Gillespie.

He received his Bachelor of Arts in Sociology in 1978 and his Bachelor of Science in 1985 in Secondary Education – Biology, both from IUP. Mr. Gillespie retired from the Apollo-Ridge School District in June 2018 after 33 years of teaching. Throughout his career, he was a baseball head coach for 17 years and a football assistant coach for 13 years. He was a 1995 recipient of the University of Pittsburgh Faculty of Education and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Outstanding Educator for Excellence in Education. After retirement, he worked for PennDOT as a CDL driver and flagman. In his free time he writes, performs and records his own music.

Scott is survived by his daughter, Madelyn Gillespie of Blairsville, two sisters, Donna Townsend of Lakeland, Florida; Dolores Callahan and her husband, Fr. Michael of Trout Run, Pennsylvania; brother, Steven Gillespie of Longmont, Colorado and special friend, Carol Robertson of Austin, Texas. He is further remembered by several nieces and nephews.

Friends and family will be received Friday, April 22, 2022, from 4 p.m. until the time of service at 5 p.m., with Pastor Mark Heckman officiating at Shoemaker Funeral Home, 49 N. Walnut St., Blairsville, PA.

Interment will be in Montoursville Cemetery at the convenience of the family at a later date.

To view the online obituary, sign the guest registry, or send your condolences, visit www.shoemakerfamilyservices.com.


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Cambridge high school students share their thoughts ahead of June’s Ontario election https://woonsockethigh.org/cambridge-high-school-students-share-their-thoughts-ahead-of-junes-ontario-election/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://woonsockethigh.org/cambridge-high-school-students-share-their-thoughts-ahead-of-junes-ontario-election/

For Maya Darcy, the environment is one of her top issues as she wonders who she will vote for in the upcoming Ontario election.

“I don’t want the sun to burn the Earth,” said the recently turned 18-year-old student from St. Benedict’s Catholic Secondary School in Cambridge.

“Definitely the environment, the upbringing, the growth, like for my children – even when I’m older, the things that are happening now are going to affect my children and my grandchildren.”

CBC Kitchener-Waterloo recently visited the Challenges and Changes in Society grade 12 class at St. Benedict’s, taught by Cindy Penner.

Students were asked about their main concerns ahead of the June 2 election. Not all of the students chose to speak to CBC KW, but those who did shared their top issues and explained how they get their news.

Student Candice Rodricks says her main issues are the environment and Indigenous issues, including drinking water. (Kate Bueckert/CBC)

Candice Rodricks, 18, echoed Darcy’s concerns about the environment and added that the issues facing Indigenous communities are a top priority for her.

“Our generation inherits this world and we inherit this society, and so I think it’s really important that even though we’re not fully grown adults yet, the decisions that our government is making right now [are] is going to affect our future,” she said.

“I think it’s really important to make sure you have a voice.”

Mariana Jesus accepted. She turns 18 in May and has already had heated political conversations around the dinner table with her family.

Mariana Jesus says her parents and grandparents are interested in and discuss politics, which also influenced her desire to learn more. (Kate Bueckert/CBC)

“I’m a first-generation Canadian and I notice that even my grandparents who don’t live in their home country will stay informed about what’s going on…the political state. And I want that for me because J kind of grew up with it and I want to stay informed,” she said.

Education, a major issue

Education was a priority for some students, including 18-year-old Julia Renner. She said she and her classmates had felt the impact of remote learning, due to COVID-19, and noted that there had been teacher strikes before the pandemic that also had disrupted his education.

“I’m a student now. I’m going to be a student for at least the next four years. I think I could become a teacher. So that’s an important part of my life.”

She said she had a pretty good idea who she would vote for in June.

“My political stance is very similar to my parents’, really. So I’ve been pretty determined on that for a while,” Renner said.

CBC KW recently visited St. Benedict’s Catholic High School to talk to students about their top issues in the upcoming provincial election. Pictured are students Julia Renner, Rebecca Reeve and Tara Lade, left to right. (Kate Bueckert/CBC)

Madeleine Eggleton, 18, said she was looking forward to voting.

“I think it’s important for young people to vote. You know, we’re, like, the future,” she said with a bit of a laugh before getting serious about her main issue.

“My biggest concern is probably education and making sure I get a good post-secondary education,” she said.

“I just want to make sure that my college experience is authentic and that I’m learning to the fullest of my potential.”

Madeleine Eggleton says she’s not sure politicians listen to young people. “But I think they focus more on what the parents want because those are the people who can vote them in and out.” (Kate Bueckert/CBC)

Source of information

When asked where they get their information about politicians and their promises, students said it was often via social media apps like TikTok or Instagram, but also their friends, parents and media outlets. information.

Rebecca Reeve, 17, said she sometimes watches the news with her parents.

“I try to stay informed. I feel like a lot of things are really confusing,” she said. “I find it a bit overwhelming because there’s so much to take in. And I feel like it’s all thrown at you at once.”

Her friend, Tara Lade, 18, said she considers herself to be “quite politically active” and in the know.

“I try to keep myself informed and I have opinions,” Lade said. “I think it’s a privilege to be able to vote and I really want to take advantage of it. I come from a family that really encourages me to vote and has encouraged me to vote for a few years now.”

Students excited, nervous about voting

Morgan Barillari, 17, said she was excited to possibly vote.

“I’m thrilled to be 18 because I’m a little excited to vote. I think the reason for that is I want to start learning more about politics.”

Morgan Barillari says she’s interested in learning more about the voting process and what the various candidates have to say. (Kate Bueckert/CBC)

That’s partly because she says she’s passionate about how victims of sexual assault are treated, but it’s an issue she says is largely ignored.

“I have the impression that the government does not pay enough attention to how to take care of [for victims of] sexual assault, as a therapy. And I feel like they should pay more attention to it.”

For Cadee Wilson, who turns 18 next month, understanding politics has been important to her in a recent relationship where her boyfriend had more conservative and traditional values ​​than her.

“I felt the need to push my opinion a bit because I find sometimes people are more biased towards their political views,” she said.

“I think we need to be able to freely share our own political opinions with everyone and have a choice, that’s why I think voting is really important.”

Kelsey Taillon, 18, said she believed she had made up her mind about how she would vote, but still wanted to know more about the different parties and candidates.

“I want to make sure I’m voting knowingly in the right decision. For example, 100% sure before I go to vote. And sometimes I think things can change just before I vote,” a- she declared.

Ava Castro says she has friends who are politically minded and talk about the issues, and she has friends who don’t talk about them at all. She says some of her friends are afraid to voice their opinions for fear someone will argue with them or tell them they are wrong. (Kate Bueckert/CBC)

Ava Castro will not be able to vote in June, but will turn 18 in time for the municipal elections in October. She admitted feeling stressed about voting.

“Of course, I would like to be more educated and know more about when I vote, and voting excites me because it feels like a coming-of-age accomplishment,” she said.

“But at the same time, it feels like an obligation. Even if you don’t have to [vote]it seems like people are saying you have to or you’re not giving to our society and you’re not giving to our country and that makes me really nervous.”

Craig Norris, host of CBC KW’s The Morning Edition, speaks to students in a Year 12 class on challenges and changes in society at St. Benedict’s Catholic Secondary School in Cambridge. (Kate Bueckert/CBC)


CBC Kitchener-Waterloo wants to hear your top concerns in the June 2 provincial election. Please complete the form below. If you would like to be contacted by a journalist or be part of a panel of voters on the radio, please leave your contact details.

]]> Student in custody after another student was stabbed in high school https://woonsockethigh.org/student-in-custody-after-another-student-was-stabbed-in-high-school/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 22:34:00 +0000 https://woonsockethigh.org/student-in-custody-after-another-student-was-stabbed-in-high-school/ Brockton police say a 17-year-old student was in custody Friday in connection with the stabbing of another high school student. A stay-at-home order was ordered at Brockton High School shortly after 12:30 p.m. Friday after the stabbing, Brockton police said. The attacker fled the school grounds immediately after the incident, police said. The victim was taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries and was alert and responsive, police said. The incident is still under investigation. In October, one student brought a gun to school and another shared a photo of a magazine clip strapped to his waist. Soon after, the school installed metal detectors, but this resulted in long queues to enter the school. The school stopped using metal detectors in November.

Brockton police say a 17-year-old student was in custody Friday in connection with the stabbing of another high school student.

A stay-at-home order was ordered at Brockton High School shortly after 12:30 p.m. Friday following the stabbing, Brockton police said.

The attacker fled the school grounds immediately after the incident, police said.

The victim was taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries and was alert and responsive, police said.

The incident is still under investigation.

In October, one student brought a gun to school and another shared a photo of a magazine clip strapped to his waist.

Soon after, the school installed metal detectors, but this resulted in long queues to enter the school. The school stopped using metal detectors in November.

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Landrum: high school teacher dies https://woonsockethigh.org/landrum-high-school-teacher-dies/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 19:29:00 +0000 https://woonsockethigh.org/landrum-high-school-teacher-dies/

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Spartanburg County School District 1 has announced the death of one of its teachers. The district posted on Facebook that Jennifer Johnson, who began teaching at Campobello Gramling School in 2000, has passed away. She was 48 years old. Her obituary said she was from Spartanburg and a professor of biology. She said she died on November 29. His cause of death has not been disclosed. The district post said Johnson had taught at Landrum High School for the past 19 years. “She impacted the lives of many students and colleagues throughout her years at Spartanburg One,” the post said. “We continue to raise the entire Johnson family and the Landrum High School community during this difficult time.” According to his obituary, Johnson is survived by her husband and two sons. He indicates that a celebration of life is scheduled for Saturday at Landrum High School.

Spartanburg County School District 1 has announced the death of one of its teachers.

The district posted on Facebook that Jennifer Johnson, who began teaching at Campobello Gramling School in 2000, has passed away.

She was 48 years old.

Her obituary says she was a native of Spartanburg and a professor of biology.

He said she died on November 29. His cause of death has not been disclosed.

The district post said Johnson had taught at Landrum High School for the past 19 years.

“She impacted the lives of many students and colleagues throughout her years at Spartanburg One,” the post said. “We continue to raise the entire Johnson family and the Landrum High School community during this difficult time.”

According to his obituary, Johnson is survived by her husband and two sons.

He indicates that a celebration of life is scheduled for Saturday at Landrum High School.

This content is imported from Facebook. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

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Oxford, Michigan high school shooting kills 3, injures 8 https://woonsockethigh.org/oxford-michigan-high-school-shooting-kills-3-injures-8/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://woonsockethigh.org/oxford-michigan-high-school-shooting-kills-3-injures-8/

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The Oxford High School students killed were Tate Myre, 16; Hanna St. Julian, 14, and Madisyn Baldwin, 17, according to Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard.

Eight others – seven students and a teacher – were shot dead, Bouchard said. Three are in critical condition with gunshot wounds, including a 14-year-old girl who is on a ventilator after undergoing surgery. A 14-year-old boy is in serious condition with a gunshot wound to the jaw and head, Bouchard said. Three students are in stable condition and the teacher who was shot has been fired.

“I think it’s every parent’s worst nightmare,” said Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, who added that school shootings are “a unique American problem that we need to tackle.”

“My heart goes out to the families. It is an unimaginable tragedy. I hope we can all seize the opportunity and put our arms around the families, affected children and school staff and this community,” said Whitmer.

There have been several other non-fatal injuries sustained by people as they rushed out of the school, Bouchard said. Most were treated and released in an assembly area, he said.

The suspect, a sophomore at the school, was taken into custody without incident two to three minutes after authorities responded to the shooting, Bouchard said. His parents hired a lawyer and did not allow him to speak to the police, said Deputy Sheriff Michael G. McCabe.

The suspect is being held at the Oakland County Children’s Village – a juvenile detention center – and is on suicide watch where he is checked every 15 minutes, said David Coulter, Oakland County Director.

How the shooting unfolded

At a press conference Tuesday night, Bouchard gave more details about the shooting.

The semi-automatic handgun recovered by law enforcement was purchased by the suspect’s father on Friday, he said.

The weapon, a 9MM Sig Sauer SP2022 pistol that was loaded at the time of its confiscation, still contained seven rounds, Bouchard said.

A video camera in the school showed the gunman “came out of the bathroom with the gun,” but it was not clear where the gunman went next, the sheriff said.

The police arrived at the school a few minutes after the emergency calls concerning the shooting.

“As they were walking down the hall, they saw him. He raised his hands, they took a gun and they took him into custody,” Bouchard said.

A deputy loaded Myre into their car, but the 16-year-old died on the way to the hospital, the sheriff said. A dispatcher also lost a relative in a shootout.

“It touches us all personally and deeply and will remain so for a long time. This injury will never go away, ”said Bouchard.

Authorities have recovered several shell casings from the school and believe around 15 to 20 shots were fired. There is no indication that the suspect was wearing a bulletproof vest, McCabe said earlier Tuesday.

“At the moment, we believe he acted on his own,” McCabe said. He said authorities were aware of how the suspect allegedly brought the weapon into the school, but declined to release details.

Oxford High School, seen here on Tuesday, November 30, is about 45 miles north of Detroit.

All of the evacuated students were transferred to a nearby store to be reunited with relatives. About 25 agencies and nearly 60 ambulances responded, according to John Lyman, public information officer for the Rochester Hills Fire Department.

The families of the victims have been notified. It is currently not known whether the three students killed were targeted, McCabe said.

“We did three sweeps of the school to make sure there are no other casualties,” he said. “We have no motive at the moment. We are still investigating this.”

A search warrant was executed at the suspect’s home, McCabe said. Bouchard said authorities seized a phone and examined other seized items.

Although Bouchard said authorities were not aware of previous concerns, they are also investigating photos of a target and the weapon posted on social media by the suspect.

McCabe said the suspect could be charged as an adult, but that falls under the Oakland County District Attorney’s office. Prosecutor Karen D. McDonald said in a statement Tuesday that her office had “begun the process of receiving information regarding the investigation” into the shooting.

“I was both horrified and saddened to learn of the Oxford High School shooting this afternoon. My office and I have been in constant communication with the Sheriff’s Office, Oakland County Juvenile Court and other government and law enforcement agencies, ”McDonald said. “We intend to examine it thoroughly and to issue appropriate charges promptly.”

Parents move away with their children from the Meijer parking lot, where many students have gathered.

Oxford Schools Superintendent Tim Throne told the press conference that the shooting shocked him. “It’s devastating,” he said.

Throne declined to comment on why there were no metal detectors in the school, but said that to his knowledge, metal detectors had never been mentioned in the conversation prior to the shooting.

“The vast majority of schools in America don’t have metal detectors,” Bouchard said.

Student says he barricaded himself in class

Aiden Page is an Oxford high school student who hid in a classroom during a shooting that left three dead and eight injured.

Aiden Page, a high school student at Oxford High School, told CNN’s Anderson Cooper on Tuesday that the gunman was so close to his classroom that a bullet pierced one of the desks Page and other students were using to barricade the door.

Page said everything had shifted into high gear when he, other students and his teachers heard two gunshots.

“We heard two gunshots and after that my teacher ran into the room, locked it, we barricaded ourselves and then covered the windows and hid,” he said.

The class was closed for an hour, Page said. Meanwhile, some students armed themselves with whatever they could find.

In the age of active shooters, a new mantra has emerged: “Run”.  To hide.  Fight. '

“We grabbed calculators, we grabbed scissors just in case the shooter got in and we had to attack them,” he said. “Some were crying, some were trying to support others. Others were trying to come up with ideas just in case.”

Page said the whole experience was “crazy” and he wondered if he would survive the ordeal.

“The very first thing in my head was, ‘Is this really happening? I’m going to text my family, say I love them just in case, if I were to die.’ Then when everything calmed down for a second, I was able to catch my breath and streamline things, ”he said.

“It will definitely be strange to come back, especially knowing that people have been injured and a few students have also died.”

President and state officials react to shooting

President Joe Biden addressed the shooting on Tuesday while in Minnesota, saying, “My heart goes out to the families who suffer the unimaginable grief of losing a loved one.”

“You have to know that this whole community must be in shock right now,” Biden said.

Biden mourns students killed in Michigan school shooting

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel said her department offered assistance to local law enforcement and expressed “sincere gratitude” to first responders at the scene.

“My heart goes out to the parents who have lost their children and to the students, teachers, staff and families reeling from the tragedy of a school shooting in their community,” said Nessel. “We must act to properly address gun violence in our schools and the continuing threat of another unacceptable tragedy if we continue to offer only thoughts and prayers. Our children deserve better.”

Detroit’s professional sports teams – including the Tigers, red wings, piston and Lions – released statements about the shooting.
“We share the grief felt by all who have been touched by today’s tragic events in Oxford”, Detroit Lions tweeted. “As an organization, we send our prayers to the victims and offer our support to the entire Oxford community during this painful time.”

CNN’s Allie Malloy, Brian Vitagliano, Laura Ly, Jill Martin and Alex Harring contributed to this report.


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Afghan Taliban ban girls from attending high school https://woonsockethigh.org/afghan-taliban-ban-girls-from-attending-high-school/ https://woonsockethigh.org/afghan-taliban-ban-girls-from-attending-high-school/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 14:27:00 +0000 https://woonsockethigh.org/afghan-taliban-ban-girls-from-attending-high-school/

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KABUL — Afghan teenage girls were not allowed to return to school on Saturday as classrooms across the country reopened for the first time since the Taliban seized power last month, raising concerns that their new fundamentalist government permanently bans secondary education for girls.

The absence of teenage girls in classrooms as their male comrades returned follows a decree issued by the Taliban on Friday ordering male students and teachers to return to high schools and religious seminars.

The statement from the Ministry of Education does not mention girls, which amounts to a de facto ban for them from going to secondary school at this time. The Taliban have allowed girls up to grade six to attend school, but they will be taught in separate classrooms from boys.

Some private universities have also been allowed to open classrooms for girls, although most female students seem to stay at home out of fear. Afghan universities are regulated by a separate ministry from the Ministry of Education.

The news raises new fears about how the Taliban will treat Afghan women. They pledged to respect women’s rights within the boundaries of Islam, but did not fully explain what those boundaries are. When the Taliban was in power in the late 1990s, they imposed draconian restrictions on women, barring them from most workplaces and education and forbidding them to leave home without a male guardian.

“All the girls are depressed now. They want to study and work, ”said a teacher at Malalai Girls’ High School in Kabul. “Some girls were in their last semester. They only needed one step to graduate, but look, now they don’t know what to do.

Narges Hussaini, a 14-year-old eighth-grader at Jebrael Girls’ School in the western town of Herat, said she couldn’t imagine not being able to study.

“I have worked so hard for the past eight years and have always been the best student in my class. I want to become a doctor and help my people, ”she said. “I have very big dreams. I cannot abandon them.

Rahila Amir Mohammad, a teacher at Habibia Girls’ Primary School in Kabul, where pre-teens returned to class on Saturday, wearing black dresses and white scarves, said her school taught boys and girls together. However, the Taliban have now ordered them to separate the students by gender.

Pre-teens were allowed to return to classrooms on Saturday.

Taliban officials have said they will consider allowing girls to attend schools once the security situation permits, a position that echoes the policies of the movement when it was in power at the end of the years. 1990. At that time, girls were not allowed to go to school due to alleged security concerns, but the Taliban never formally prohibited girls’ education. In recent years, the Taliban have followed similar policies in areas under their control.

“Afghan women remember very well that between 1996 and 2001, they were not told that they would never be able to study or work. They were told to be patient and to wait for a day that never came. So this moment seems very familiar to me, ”said Heather Barr, associate director of the Women’s Rights Division of Human Rights Watch, with expertise in Afghanistan. “There is no reason to be optimistic about the end of this ban.”

The United Nations has said it welcomes the reopening of secondary schools, which have been closed for months due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

“We are, however, deeply concerned that many girls are not allowed to return at this time,” Unicef ​​Executive Director Henrietta Fore said on Saturday.

The UN has asked the Taliban to clarify when girls will be allowed to return to school, and diplomats are still hoping the new Afghan government will not impose a permanent ban, according to people familiar with the conversations.

“We hope that by next week girls’ schools will reopen,” said Sediqa Nuristani, principal of Malalai high school. “Otherwise, the situation will be chaotic and the future of our children will be ruined.

Some girls’ schools in the northern city of Mazar-e-Sharif have reported that they have been allowed to welcome girls back into classrooms, despite the ban elsewhere.

In Kabul, some boys have stayed at home in solidarity with their classmates.

“I did not go to school today to show my disagreement with the Taliban and to protest that they are banning girls from going to school,” said an 18-year-old student from the ‘Wahdat boys’ school in the capital. “Women represent half of society. This shows that the Taliban have not changed. I will not show up to school until the girls’ schools are open as well.

Despite promises to support women’s education and employment, the Taliban leadership has effectively banned most Afghan women from working. Last month, the movement recalled men from government offices, but said security concerns made it dangerous for women. Health and education are the only main sectors where some women have returned to work. In the 1990s, the Taliban also allowed women to work in these sectors.

The Taliban handed over the previous government’s Women’s Ministry building to the newly re-established Ministry of Vice Prevention and Promotion of Virtue.

A classroom that would normally be full of Grade 12 girls was empty of students on Saturday.

This ministry in the 1990s was tasked with enforcing the Taliban’s fundamentalist Islamic laws, often beating up women who violated strict dress codes or ventured out in public without a male guardian.

The international community has some economic leverage that it can use to try to exert a moderating influence on the Taliban, as the United States and other Western countries have frozen more than $ 9 billion in foreign assets. Afghanistan – almost all of its reserves – and cut off most humanitarian aid. This has exacerbated a humanitarian crisis in the country, but also posed a serious challenge to the Taliban as they attempt to rule.

“The international community doesn’t have many cards, but they still have a few, and they should be using them to advocate for women’s rights,” Barr said. “He is faced with the delicate task of trying to stem the humanitarian crisis while exerting leverage – it is difficult but not impossible, if the political will is there. ”

Afghanistan under Taliban rule

Write to Sune Engel Rasmussen at sune.rasmussen@wsj.com

Copyright © 2021 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

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Melrose Public Schools Quarantine 2 Classrooms Amid COVID Outbreak https://woonsockethigh.org/melrose-public-schools-quarantine-2-classrooms-amid-covid-outbreak/ https://woonsockethigh.org/melrose-public-schools-quarantine-2-classrooms-amid-covid-outbreak/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 01:41:00 +0000 https://woonsockethigh.org/melrose-public-schools-quarantine-2-classrooms-amid-covid-outbreak/

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The superintendent of Melrose Public Schools told WCVB that at least two classes are in quarantine following several positive cases of COVID-19. seven days after their last show, which was Thursday, September 2. The first day of school for students at Melrose Public Schools was Wednesday, September 1. As long as they remain asymptomatic, students considered to be close contacts could return in person. learning from Friday, September 10, according to Kukenberger. The superintendent said all affected students, staff, families and school communities have been notified of the positive cases and will not share the names of specific schools or classrooms for confidentiality purposes. “The health and well-being of our students and staff is our number one priority. We are committed to doing everything possible to mitigate risk,” said Kukenberger. Melrose Public Schools has implemented a strategy of Multi-pronged risk mitigation and additional details regarding protocols are included in the district’s back-to-school plan. Kukenberger says the district will continue to follow directions from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Massachusetts Department. of Public On August 25, DESE officially issued a statewide mask warrant for all public students and staff in Kindergarten to Grade 12. 1, only applies indoors and children 5 years of age and over, and there are exceptions for students and staff who cannot wear a mask due to medical conditions or behavioral needs. also required to wear a mask in school buildings. The indoor mask requirement, however, does not apply when students and staff are eating, drinking, or taking mask breaks. sent to school districts After October 1, middle and high schools would only be allowed to lift the mandatory mask for vaccinated students and staff if the school achieves a certain vaccination rate – at least 80% of students and staff in ‘a school building are vaccinated. Unvaccinated students and staff would still be required to wear masks. Additionally, DESE requires that student-athletes and coaches who participate in any activity related to indoor sports wear masks, which is in accordance with guidelines provided by the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association.

The director of Melrose Public Schools told WCVB that at least two classes are in quarantine following several positive cases of COVID-19.

In an email, Dr Julie Kukenberger said some additional people were also in quarantine and all close contacts would be quarantined for seven days from their last exposure, which was Thursday, September 2.

The first day of school for students at Melrose Public Schools was Wednesday, September 1.

As long as they remain asymptomatic, students considered close contacts could resume in-person learning as early as Friday, September 10, according to Kukenberger.

The superintendent said all affected students, staff, families and school communities have been notified of the positive cases and will not share the names of specific schools or classrooms for confidentiality purposes.

“The health and well-being of our students and staff is our number one priority. We are committed to doing everything possible to mitigate risk,” said Kukenberger.

Melrose Public Schools have implemented a multi-pronged risk mitigation strategy and additional details regarding protocols are included in the district’s back-to-school plan.

Kukenberger says the district will continue to follow the advice of the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, as well as work with the Melrose Health Department to “navigate these difficult times.”

On August 25, DESE officially issued a statewide mask warrant for all K-12 students and public staff.

The mask mandate, which runs until October 1, only applies indoors and to children ages 5 and up, and there are exceptions for students and staff who cannot wear a mask. due to medical conditions or behavioral needs. All visitors must also wear a mask in school buildings.

The indoor mask requirement, however, does not apply when students and staff are eating, drinking, or taking mask breaks.

Want to know more ?: Here is the full DESE mask warrant notice sent to school districts

After October 1, middle and high schools would only be allowed to lift the mandatory mask for vaccinated students and staff if the school achieves a certain vaccination rate – at least 80% of students and staff in a school building are vaccinated. Unvaccinated students and staff would still be required to wear masks.

Additionally, DESE requires that student-athletes and coaches who participate in any indoor athletic activity wear face masks, which is in accordance with guidelines provided by the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association.

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