Education boss ‘confident’ Shrewsbury has enough secondary school places

A renewed plea for another school to be built in Shrewsbury was launched by councilor Alex Wagner after a town council meeting.

During the meeting, a concerned parent claimed that more than a fifth of children in Shrewsbury were not getting places in their first choice school. She said that in Shrewsbury, 79% of children get their first choice, compared to a county average of 94%.

However, Councilor Kirstie Hurst-Knight, Shropshire Council’s cabinet member for children and education, said the figures had been ‘misunderstood’ and insisted there were enough places for children. high school children in the city.

She said: ‘The information quoted comes from official school preference data from local authorities after Secondary Offer Day on March 19. These data have unfortunately been misunderstood and an inaccurate interpretation of them has been presented.

“The data reported to the Department for Education each year is by local authority area and is not broken down into smaller geographical areas, such as towns. This allows comparable data to be compared across the country for each local authority.

“However, we can confidently say that there are enough secondary school places in Shrewsbury for Shrewsbury residents. The number of applications for places in Shrewsbury secondary schools received before offer day from families living in the Shrewsbury catchment area was 788. There are currently 816 places available in Shrewsbury’s four secondary schools after the completion of the fantastic new last year teaching block at Meole Brace School.

“Across the board area, 93.7% of pupils, even more than last year, have been offered their first preference school for next year, 99% have been offered a place in one of their favorite schools and all the children were offered a school location.

Councilor Wagner, who represents Bowbrook, started a petition last year for a new high school. Over 500 signatures were collected.

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